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This in turn could harm both our ability to make distributions to our stockholders and the market price of our common stock. Our business may be adversely affected by disruptions in the debt and equity capital markets and institutional lending market, including a lack of access to capital or prohibitively high costs of obtaining or replacing capital, both within the United States and abroad. The appointment of an administrator may similarly create a risk that the proceeds of realization of our assets in an administration will be insufficient to provide us with any equity in those properties or surplus proceeds.

Tax declaration: average refund of 974 euros


Our investment allocation policy with our Manager could produce unfavorable results for us that could harm our business. Our Manager also has acquired and may in the future acquire additional interests in third parties, such as management firms that manage certain of our properties, which may cause its interests to differ from ours.

Our Manager may also encourage our use of third party service providers, including those in which our Manager owns an interest, for which we pay a fee. In certain transactions our Manager may receive a fee from the managed company. There is no guaranty that any such transactions will be favorable to us. Further, there are conflicts of interest that arise when our Manager makes expense allocation determinations, as well as in connection with any fees payable between us and our Manager.

As a result of their interests in our Manager, other managed companies and the fact that they engage in other business activities on behalf of others, these individuals may face conflicts of interest in allocating their time among us, our Manager and other managed companies or strategic vehicles and other business activities in which they are involved.

In addition, certain management personnel performing services on behalf of our Manager own equity interests in our Manager or other managed companies and our Manager may grant additional equity interests in our Manager or other managed companies to such persons in connection with their continued services.

These conflicts of interest, as well as the loyalties of these individuals to other entities and investors, could result in action or inaction that is detrimental to our business, which could harm the implementation of our business strategy and our investment opportunities. If we do not successfully implement our business strategy, we may be unable to generate the cash needed to make distributions to our stockholders or to maintain or increase the value of our portfolio.

In such situations, we may not receive the level of support and assistance that we may receive if we were internally managed or if our Manager did not act as a manager for other entities. Our executive officers are employees of our Manager and face conflicts of interest related to their positions and interests in our Manager, which could hinder our ability to implement our business strategy.

We do not have employment agreements with any of our executive officers. If the management agreement with our Manager were to be terminated, we would lose the services of all our executive officers.

Furthermore, if any of our executive officers ceased to be employed by our Manager, such individual would also no longer serve as one of our executive officers. Our Manager is an independent contractor and controls the activities of its employees, including our executive officers. Our executive officers therefore owe duties to our Manager and its stockholders, which may from time-to-time conflict with the duties they owe to us and our stockholders.

In addition, our executive officers may also own equity in our Manager or its other managed companies. As a result, the loyalties of these individuals to other entities and investors could result in action or inaction that is detrimental to our business, which could harm the implementation of our business strategy and our investment opportunities.

Our inability to motivate and retain these individuals could also harm our business and our prospects. Additionally, competition for experienced real estate professionals could require our Manager or us to pay higher wages and provide additional benefits to attract qualified employees, which could result in higher compensation expenses to us.

Our Manager may enter into strategic partnerships and joint ventures to further its own interests or the interests of its managed companies, including us. Our Manager may not be able to realize the anticipated benefits of these strategic partnerships and joint ventures. In addition, where our Manager does not have a controlling interest, it may not be able to take actions that are in our best interests due to a lack of full control.

Moreover, disagreements or disputes between our Manager and its partners could result in litigation, which could potentially distract our Manager from our business. Our Manager manages our portfolio pursuant to very broad investment guidelines and our board of directors does not approve each investment and financing decision made by our Manager unless required by our investment guidelines.

Our Manager is authorized to follow very broad investment guidelines established by our board of directors. Our board of directors periodically reviews our investment guidelines and our investment portfolio but does not, and is not required to review all of our proposed investments, except in limited circumstances as set forth in our investment guidelines.

Our board of directors may also make modifications to our investment guidelines from time to time as it deems appropriate. In addition, in conducting periodic reviews or modifying our investment guidelines, our board of directors may rely primarily on information provided to them by our Manager. Furthermore, transactions entered into by our Manager on our behalf may be costly, difficult or impossible to unwind by the time they are reviewed by our board of directors.

Our Manager has flexibility within the broad parameters of our investment guidelines in determining the types and amounts of investments in which to invest on our behalf, including making investments that may result in returns that are substantially below expectations or result in losses, which could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations, or may otherwise not be in the best interests of our stockholders. We have entered into a management agreement with our Manager, which governs our relationship with our Manager.

Our Manager maintains a fiduciary relationship with us. Instances of criminal activity and fraud by participants in the investment management industry and disclosures of trading and. This activity is expected to result in continued changes to the laws and regulations governing the investment management industry and more aggressive enforcement of the existing laws and regulations.

Our Manager could be subject to civil liability, criminal liability, or sanction, including revocation of its registration as an investment adviser in the United States or in any foreign jurisdictions where it is registered, revocation of the licenses of its employees, censures, fines or temporary suspension or permanent bar from conducting business, if it is found to have violated any of these laws or regulations.

Any such liability or sanction could adversely affect its ability to manage our business. Our Manager must continually address conflicts between its interests and those of its managed companies, including us. In addition, the SEC and other regulators have increased their scrutiny of potential conflicts of interest. However, appropriately dealing with conflicts of interest is complex and difficult and if our Manager fails, or appears to fail, to deal appropriately with conflicts of interest, it could face litigation or regulatory proceedings or penalties, any of which could adversely affect its ability to manage our business.

Risks Related to Our Investments. A prolonged economic slowdown, a lengthy or severe recession or declining real estate values could harm our investments. Our investments may be susceptible to economic slowdowns or recessions, which could lead to financial losses and a decrease in revenues, earnings and asset values. Any economic slowdown or recession, most particularly affecting the jurisdictions in which we own properties, in addition to other non-economic factors such as an excess supply of properties, could have a material negative impact on the values of our investments.

Declining real estate values will reduce the value of our properties, as well as our ability to refinance our properties and use the value of our existing properties to support the purchase or investment in additional properties. Slower than expected economic growth pressured by a strained labor market, along with overall financial uncertainty, could result in lower occupancy rates and lower lease rates across many property types and may create obstacles for us to achieve our business plans.

We may also be less able to pay principal and interest on our borrowings, which could cause us to lose title to properties securing our borrowings. Any of the foregoing could significantly harm our revenues, results of operations, financial condition, business prospects and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. We are subject to significant competition and we may not be able to compete successfully for investments. We are subject to significant competition for attractive investment opportunities from other real estate investors, some of which have greater financial resources than us, including publicly-traded REITs, non-traded REITs, insurance companies, commercial and investment banking firms, private institutional funds, hedge funds, private equity funds, sovereign wealth funds and other investors.

We may not be able to compete successfully for investments. In addition, the number of entities and the amount of funds competing for suitable investments may increase. If we pay higher prices for investments, our returns may be lower and the value of our investments may not increase or may decrease significantly below the amount we paid for such investments. If such events occur, we may experience lower returns on our investments.

While we are primarily focused on investing in office properties within Germany, the United Kingdom, and France, we have no established investment criteria limiting the particular country or region, industry concentration or investment type of our investments. If our investments are concentrated in a particular country or region or property type that experiences adverse economic conditions, our investments may lose value and we may experience losses.

Properties that we may acquire may be concentrated in a particular country or region or in a particular property type. These current and future investments carry the risks associated with significant regional or industry concentration.

We have not established and do not plan to establish any investment criteria to limit our exposure to these risks for future investments. As a result, properties underlying our investments may be overly concentrated in certain countries or regions or industries and we may experience losses as a result. A worsening of economic conditions, a natural disaster or civil disruptions in a particular country or region in which our investments may be concentrated, or economic upheaval with respect to a particular property type, could have an adverse effect on our business, including impairing the value of our properties.

Our exposure to the risks inherent in the office sector may make us more vulnerable to a downturn or slowdown in the office sector. These adverse effects may be more pronounced than if our investments were more diversified. We are subject to additional risks due to the international nature of our investments, which could adversely impact our business and results of operations.

All of our investments are located within Europe, primarily within Germany, the United Kingdom and France. We and our Manager may not be as familiar with the potential risks to our investments outside of the United States and we may incur losses as a result.

Each of these risks might adversely affect our performance and impair our ability to make distributions to our stockholders required to qualify and remain qualified as a REIT. In addition, there is generally less publicly available information about foreign companies and a lack of uniform financial accounting standards and practices including the availability of information in accordance with U.

GAAP which could impair our ability to analyze transactions and receive timely and accurate financial information from tenants necessary to meet our reporting obligations to financial institutions or governmental or regulatory agencies. Our business is also subject to extensive regulation by various non-U.

In many countries, the laws and regulations applicable to the financial services and securities industries are uncertain and evolving and it may be difficult for us to determine the exact requirements of local laws in every market or manage our relationships with multiple regulators in various jurisdictions.

Our inability to remain in compliance with local laws in a particular market and manage our relationships with regulators could have a significant and adverse effect not only on our businesses in that market but also on our reputation generally.

Our joint venture partners could take actions that decrease the value of an investment to us and lower our overall return. We currently are party to and may in the future enter into joint ventures with third parties to make investments.

We may also make investments in partnerships or other co-ownership arrangements or participations. Such investments may involve risks not otherwise present with other methods of investment, including, for example, the following risks: Any of the above might subject us to liabilities and thus reduce our returns on our investment with that joint venture partner.

In addition, disagreements or disputes between us and our joint venture partner could result in litigation, which could increase our expenses and potentially limit the time and effort our officers and directors are able to devote to our business. Because real estate investments are relatively illiquid, we may not be able to vary our portfolio in response to changes in economic and other conditions, which may result in losses.

Real estate investments are relatively illiquid. A variety of factors could make it difficult for us to dispose of any of our investments on acceptable terms even if a disposition is in the best interests of our stockholders.

We cannot predict whether we will be able to sell any property for the price or on the terms set by us or whether any price or other terms offered by a prospective purchaser would be acceptable to us.

We also cannot predict the length of time needed to find a willing purchaser and to close the sale of a property. Certain properties may also be subject to transfer restrictions that materially restrict us from selling that property for a period of time or impose other restrictions, such as a limitation on the amount of financing that can be placed or repaid on that property.

We may be required to expend cash to correct defects or to make improvements before a property can be sold, and we cannot assure you that we will have cash available to correct those defects or to make those improvements.

The Internal Revenue Code also places limits on our ability to sell certain properties held for fewer than two years. We may also give our tenants a right of first refusal or similar options. As a result, our ability to sell investments in response to changes in economic and other conditions could be limited.

To the extent we are unable to sell any property for its book value or at all, we may be required to take a non-cash impairment charge or loss on the sale, either of which would reduce our earnings. Limitations on our ability to respond to adverse changes in the performance of our properties may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

We are subject to risks, such as declining real estate values and operating performance, associated with future advance or capital expenditure obligations and our capital expenditure projections may prove inaccurate.

Future funding obligations subject us to significant risks such as that the property may have declined in value, projects to be completed with the additional funds may have cost overruns and the tenant may be unable to generate enough cash flow and execute its business plan, or sell or refinance the property, in order to repay our indebtedness.

We may also need to fund capital expenditures and other significant expenses for our investments in excess of those projected at the time of our underwriting because of, among other reasons, inaccurate or incomplete technical advice from our advisors at the time of underwriting that results in greater than expected expenditures.

We could also determine that we need to fund more money than we originally anticipated in order to maximize the value of our investment even though there is no assurance additional funding would be the best course of action. Further, future funding obligations require us to maintain higher liquidity than we might otherwise maintain and these funding obligations could reduce the overall return on our investments.

We could also find ourselves in a position with insufficient liquidity to fund future obligations, which could result in material losses. We may obtain only limited warranties when we purchase a property, which increases the risk that we may lose some or all of our invested capital in the property or rental income from the property if losses are incurred that are not covered by the limited warranties, which, in turn, could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results from operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

Despite our efforts, we may fail to uncover all material risks during our diligence process. The purchase of properties with limited warranties increases the risk that we may lose some or all of our invested capital in the property, as well as the loss of rental income from that property if losses are incurred that are not covered by the limited warranties.

If we experience losses that are not recoverable under the limited warranties provided by a seller, it may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

In addition, we may be further limited in our ability to enforce against breaches of certain representations. We may be required to indemnify purchasers of our assets against certain liabilities and obligations, which may affect our returns on dispositions.

We may be required to enter into real estate purchase and sale agreements with warranties, representations and indemnifications, which may expose us to liabilities and obligations following dispositions of our assets. Despite our efforts, we may fail to identify all liabilities, which may materially impair the anticipated returns on any dispositions.

Further, we may be forced to incur unexpected significant expense in connection with such liabilities and obligations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to stockholders. The price we pay for acquisitions of real property is based on our projections of market demand, occupancy and rental income, as well as on market factors, and our return on our investment may be lower than expected if any of our projections are inaccurate.

The price we pay for real property investments is based on our projections of market demand, occupancy levels, rental income, the costs of any development, redevelopment or renovation of property and other factors. In addition, increased competition in the real estate market may drive up prices for commercial real estate. If any of our projections are inaccurate or we overpay for investments and their value subsequently drops or fails to rise because of market factors, returns on our investment may be lower than expected and we could experience losses.

This may be particularly pronounced during periods of market dislocation. Our lease transactions may not result in market rates over time, which could have an adverse impact on our income and distributions to our stockholders. We expect substantially all of our rental and escalation income to come from lease transactions, which may have longer terms than one year or renewal options that specify maximum rate increases. If we do not accurately judge the potential for increases in market rates, rental and escalation increases, the terms of our lease transactions may fail to result in fair market rates over time.

Further, we may have no ability to terminate our lease transactions or adjust the rent to then-prevailing market rates. As a result, our income and distributions to our stockholders could be lower than they would otherwise be if we did not enter into lease agreements with longer terms or renewal options that specify maximum rates increase, which could have an adverse impact on our income and distributions to our stockholders. We may enter into short term leases that are subject to heightened lease turnover risk or we may invest in single tenant properties or properties that are leased primarily to one tenant, which could negatively impact our ability to comply with financial covenants under our borrowings and could materially impact our income and distributions to our stockholders.

We may also enter into leases that are short term in nature and therefore subject to heightened lease turnover risk. Additionally, for single tenant properties or our properties that are primarily leased to one tenant, such as certain of our French and Dutch properties in the SEB portfolio and the Trianon Tower, lease expirations may impact our ability to comply with financial covenants under our borrowings.

As a result, we could be subject to a sudden and material change in value of our portfolio and available cash flow from such investments in the event that these leases are not renewed or in the event that we are not able to comply with or obtain relief from our financial covenants under the borrowings related to, or cross-collateralized with, the properties that are subject to these leases. We may not be able to relet or renew leases at our properties on favorable terms, or at all.

The ability to relet or renew leases underlying our properties may be negatively impacted by challenging economic conditions in general or challenging market conditions in a particular region or asset class. For example, upon expiration or earlier termination of leases for space located at our properties, the space may not be relet or, if relet, the terms of the renewal or reletting including the cost of required renovations or concessions to tenants may be less favorable than current lease terms.

We may be receiving above market rental rates in certain instances at our properties, which may decrease upon renewal.

Any such decrease could adversely impact our income and could harm our ability to service our debt and operate successfully. Furthermore, commercial space needs may contract, resulting in lower lease renewal rates and longer releasing periods when leases are not renewed. Any of these situations may result in extended periods where there is a significant decline in revenues or no revenues generated by a property. Additionally, to the extent that market rental rates are reduced, property-level cash flow would likely be negatively affected as existing leases renew at lower rates.

If we are unable to relet or renew leases for all or substantially all of the space at these properties, if the rental rates upon such renewal or reletting are significantly lower than expected or if our reserves for these purposes prove inadequate, we will experience a reduction in net income and may be required to reduce or eliminate cash distributions to our stockholders.

Additionally, the open market lease review process in certain jurisdictions can be a lengthy one and often results in resolution though arbitration.

While the agreed rent level generally applies retroactively to the lease review date, this can be a lengthy and costly process. Many of our investments are dependent upon tenants successfully operating their businesses and their failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

We depend on our tenants to manage their day-to-day business operations in a manner that generates revenues sufficient to allow them to meet their obligations to us, including their obligations to pay rent, maintain certain insurance coverage, pay real estate taxes and maintain the properties under their operational control in a manner that does not jeopardize their operating licenses or regulatory status. We may not be able to find suitable tenants to lease our properties, and the ability of our tenants to fulfill their obligations to us may depend, in part, upon the overall profitability of their operations, including any other facilities, properties or businesses they may acquire or operate.

The cash flow generated by the operation of our properties may not be sufficient for a tenant to meet its obligations to us. Tenants who are having trouble with their cash flow are more likely to expose our properties to liens and other risks to our investments.

In addition, we may have trouble recovering from tenants who are insolvent or in financial distress. Our financial position could be weakened and our ability to fulfill our obligations under our real estate borrowings could be limited if our tenants are unable to meet their obligations to us or we fail to renew or extend our contractual relationship with any of our tenants.

In addition, to the extent we seek to replace a tenant following a default we may incur substantial delays and expenses. Further, we may be required to fund certain expenses and obligations to preserve the value of our properties while they are being marketed to secure a new tenant.

Once a suitable tenant is located, it may still take an extended period of time before the replacement tenant takes possession of the property. Any of these results could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. We may become responsible for unexpected capital improvements.

To the extent such capital improvements are not undertaken, the ability of our tenants to manage our properties effectively and on favorable terms may be affected, which in turn could materially adversely affect our business, financial conditions and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. We may be responsible under local law of certain jurisdictions in which we own property for unexpected capital improvements.

In France, the legal distribution of charges between us and the tenant may be contractually set out. However, certain French law makes it mandatory for us, as owners of the real properties, for leases entered into or renewed on or after November 3, , to incur expenditures for major repairs, in particular those related to the obsolescence of the properties and those required to meet changing legal regulation.

French law may also force us to pay certain taxes. These expenditures, which cannot be contractually transferred to the tenant, could have a material adverse effect on our business if they exceed our expectations. In addition, under German law, maintenance and modernization measures may be required to meet changing legal, environmental or market requirements e.

The costs associated with keeping properties up to market demand are borne primarily by the property owner. Lease agreements for commercial properties may also transfer responsibility for the maintenance and repair of leased properties to tenants. However, the costs of maintenance and repairs to the roof and structures and of areas located in the leased property used by several tenants may not be fully transferred to tenants by use of general terms and conditions and requires contractual limitation on the amount apportioned.

Furthermore, although tenants are generally responsible for capital improvement expenditures under typical net lease structures applicable in the United Kingdom, it is possible that a tenant may not be able to fulfill its obligations to keep a property in good operating condition.

To the extent capital improvements are not undertaken or are deferred, occupancy rates and the amount of rental and reimbursement income generated by the property may decline, which would negatively impact the overall value of the affected property.

We may be forced to incur unexpected significant expense to maintain our properties, even those that are subject to net leases. We could incur additional costs if the actual costs of maintaining or modernizing our properties exceed our estimates, if we are not permitted to raise rents in connection with maintenance and modernization measures, if hidden defects not covered by insurance or contractual warranties are discovered during the maintenance or modernization process or if additional spending is required.

Any failure to undertake appropriate maintenance and modernization measures could adversely affect our rental income and entitle tenants to withhold or reduce rental payments or even to terminate existing lease agreements. If we incur substantial unplanned maintenance, repair and modernization costs or fail to undertake appropriate maintenance measures, this could have a material adverse effect on our business, net assets, financial condition, cash flows or results of operations.

We are party to commercial leases that are heavily regulated to protect the tenant and any future amendments to such regulation could increase our expenditures. Commercial leases are heavily regulated in some countries in which we operate. In France, the contractual conditions applying to commercial leases duration, renewal, rent and rent indexation are considered matters of public policy, and as such are heavily regulated to protect the tenant.

The minimum duration of a commercial lease is nine years. In addition, the tenant has a right of revision of the rent every three years. The rent variation, however, is capped. Consequently, we cannot freely raise rents of ongoing leases in France. Furthermore, changes in the content, interpretation or enforcement of these regulations could compromise some of the practices adopted by us in managing our property holdings and increase our costs for operating, maintaining and renovating our property holding and adversely affect the valuation of our property holding.

In particular, recent changes to French law amended many provisions applicable to commercial leases in France, and more specifically: In Germany, fixed-term lease agreements with a term exceeding one year can be terminated prior to their contractually agreed expiration date if certain formal requirements are not complied with.

These include the requirement that there would be a document that contains all the material terms of the lease agreement, including all attachments and addenda and the signatures of all parties thereto.

While the details of the applicable formal requirements are assessed differently by various German courts, most courts agree that such requirements are, in principle, strict. If any of our lease agreements would not satisfy the strict written form requirements, the respective lease agreement could be deemed to have been concluded for an indefinite term.

Consequently, such lease agreement could be terminated one year after handover of the respective property to the tenant at the earliest, and at the beginning of a calendar quarter to the end of the following calendar quarter thereafter, which may result in a significantly shorter term of the lease. As a result, some of our tenants might attempt to invoke alleged non-compliance with these formal requirements in order to procure an early termination of their lease agreements or a renegotiation of the terms of such lease agreements to our disadvantage.

Moreover, we rely on certain standardized contractual general terms and conditions in Germany. As a general rule, standardized terms are regarded to be invalid under German law if they are not clear and comprehensive or if they are disproportionate and provide an unreasonable disadvantage for the other party.

It is impossible to fully avoid risks arising from the use of standardized contractual terms because of the frequency of changes that are made to the legal framework and particularly court decisions relating to general terms and conditions of business.

Even in the case of contracts prepared with legal advice, problems of this nature cannot be fully prevented, either from the outset or in the future due to subsequent changes in the legal framework, particularly case law, making it impossible for us to avoid the ensuing legal disadvantages. Such developments could lead to claims being brought against us or us being forced to bear costs that we had expected to be borne by our tenants e.

Furthermore, our lease terms in Germany typically include an annual indexation that is linked to the consumer price index for Germany Verbraucherpreisindex für Deutschland CPI , which is calculated monthly by the German Federal Statistical Office Statistisches Bundesamt. In accordance with applicable German law, these clauses provide not only for upward adjustments but also for downward adjustments tied to changes in the CPI.

Consequently, rental proceeds may decrease if the macroeconomic environment worsens and hence consumer prices decline. Furthermore, rent adjustments from indexation will generally only be triggered if certain thresholds of the CPI are met or exceeded, when compared to the index level at the beginning of the lease or the previous rent adjustment.

Consequently, we cannot freely raise rents of ongoing leases in Germany. Lease defaults, terminations or landlord-tenant disputes may reduce our income from our real estate investments.

The creditworthiness of our tenants in our real estate investments have been, or could become, negatively impacted as a result of challenging economic conditions or otherwise, which could result in their inability to meet the terms of their leases.

Lease defaults or terminations by one or more tenants may reduce our revenues unless a default is cured or a suitable replacement tenant is found promptly. In addition, disputes may arise between the landlord and tenant that result in the tenant withholding rent payments, possibly for an extended period. These disputes may lead to litigation or other legal procedures to secure payment of the rent withheld or to evict the tenant. Upon a lease default, we may have limited remedies, be unable to accelerate lease payments or evict a defaulting tenant and have limited or no recourse against a guarantor.

In addition, the legal process for evicting defaulting tenants may be lengthy and costly. Tenants as well as guarantors may have limited or no ability to satisfy any judgments we may obtain. We may also have duties to mitigate our losses and we may not be successful in that regard. Any of these situations may result in extended periods during which there is a significant decline in revenues or no revenues generated by a property.

If this occurred, it could adversely affect our results of operations. The bankruptcy, insolvency or financial deterioration of any of our tenants could significantly delay our ability to collect unpaid rents or require us to find new tenants. Our financial position and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders may be adversely affected by financial difficulties experienced by any of our major tenants, including bankruptcy, insolvency or a general downturn in business, or the occurrence of any of our major tenants failing to renew or extend their lease.

We are exposed to the risk that our tenants may not be able to meet their obligations to us or other third parties, which may result in their bankruptcy or insolvency.

Although some of our leases and loans permit us to evict a tenant, demand immediate repayment and pursue other remedies, bankruptcy laws afford certain rights to a party that has filed for bankruptcy or reorganization.

A tenant in bankruptcy may be able to restrict our ability to collect unpaid rents or interest during the bankruptcy proceeding. Bankruptcy laws vary across the different jurisdictions in Europe. In certain jurisdictions, a debtor has the option to assume or reject an unexpired lease. A debtor cannot choose to keep the beneficial provisions of a contract while rejecting the burdensome ones; the contract must be assumed or rejected as a whole.

In France, if the debtor chooses to continue an unexpired commercial lease, but still fails to pay the rent in connection with the occupancy after the bankruptcy procedure commencement order, we cannot legally request the termination of the lease before the end of a three-month period from the date of issue of the order relating to the bankruptcy procedure commencement.

Most of our tenants in the real estate that we own are legal entities rather than individuals. The obligations these entities owe us are typically non-recourse so we can only look to our collateral, and at times, the assets of the entity may not be sufficient to recover our investment.

As a result, our risk of loss may be greater than for leases with individuals. Unlike individuals involved in bankruptcies, these legal entities will generally not have personal assets and creditworthiness at stake. As a result, the default or bankruptcy of one of our tenants, or a general partner or managing member of that tenant, may impair our ability to enforce our rights and remedies under the terms of the lease agreement.

Compliance with fire and safety and other regulations may require us or our tenants to make unanticipated expenditures which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

Our properties are required to comply with jurisdiction-specific fire and safety regulations, building codes and other land regulations and licensing or certification requirements as they may be adopted by governmental agencies and bodies from time-to-time.

We may be required to incur substantial costs to comply with those requirements. Changes in labor and other laws could also negatively impact us and our tenants. For example, changes to labor-related statutes or regulations could significantly impact the cost of labor in the workforce, which would increase the costs faced by our tenants and increase their likelihood of default.

Environmental compliance costs and liabilities associated with our properties may materially impair the value of our investments and expose us to liability. Under various international and local environmental laws, ordinances and regulations, a current or previous owner of real property, such as us, and our tenants, may be liable in certain circumstances for the costs of investigation, removal or remediation of, or related releases of, certain hazardous or toxic substances, including materials containing asbestos, at, under or disposed of in connection with such property, as well as certain other potential costs relating to hazardous or toxic substances, including government fines and damages for injuries to persons and adjacent property.

In addition, some environmental laws create a lien on the contaminated site in favor of the government for damages and the costs it incurs in connection with the contamination. These laws often impose liability without regard to whether the owner knew of, or was responsible for, the presence or disposal.

We, or our tenants, as owner of a site, may be liable to third parties for damages and injuries resulting from environmental contamination emanating from the site. The scope of the indemnification our tenants have agreed to provide us may be limited. For instance, some of our agreements with our tenants do not require them to indemnify us for environmental liabilities arising before the tenant took possession of the premises.

Further, any such tenant may not be able to fulfill its indemnification obligations. If we were deemed liable for any such environmental liabilities and were unable to seek recovery against our tenant, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. We may make investments that involve property types and structures with which we have less familiarity, thereby increasing our risk of loss.

We may determine to invest in property types with which we have limited or no prior experience. When investing in property types with which we have limited or no prior experience, we may not be successful in our diligence and underwriting efforts. We may also be unsuccessful in preserving value if conditions deteriorate and we may expose ourselves to unknown substantial risks.

Furthermore, these investments could require additional management time and attention relative to investments with which we are more familiar. All of these factors increase our risk of loss. We may dispose of properties that no longer meet our strategic plans.

If the proceeds of our dispositions are not what we expect, or if we cannot effectively and timely deploy the proceeds from a disposal, there could be an adverse effect on our results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. We then intend to use the proceeds generated from any potential disposition to acquire additional properties that meet the requirements of our strategic plans.

We may not be able to dispose of properties for the amounts of proceeds we expect, or at all. In addition, if we are able to dispose of those properties, we may not be able to use the capital in a timely or more efficient manner. As such, we may not be able to adequately time any decrease in revenues from the sale of properties with a corresponding increase in revenues associated with the acquisition of new properties.

The failure to dispose of properties, or to timely and more efficiently apply the proceeds from any disposition of properties to attractive acquisition opportunities could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. Uninsured losses relating to real estate and lender requirements to obtain insurance may reduce our returns.

There are types of losses relating to real estate, generally catastrophic in nature, such as losses due to wars, acts of terrorism, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, pollution or environmental matters, for which we may not obtain insurance unless we are required to do so by our mortgage lenders.

If any of our properties incurs a casualty loss that is not fully covered by insurance, the value of our assets will be reduced by any such uninsured loss. In addition, other than any reserves we may establish, we have no source of funding to repair or reconstruct any uninsured damaged property, and we cannot assure you that any such sources of funding will be available to us for such purposes in the future.

Also, to the extent we must pay unexpectedly large amounts for uninsured losses, we could suffer reduced earnings that would result in less cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

In cases where we are required by mortgage lenders to obtain casualty loss insurance for catastrophic events or terrorism, such insurance may not be available, or may not be available at a reasonable cost, which could inhibit our ability to finance or refinance our properties. Additionally, if we obtain such insurance, the costs associated with owning a property would increase and could have a material adverse effect on the net income from the property, and, thus, the cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

Risks Related to Our Financing Strategy. We may not be able to access financing sources on attractive terms, if at all, which could adversely affect our ability to execute our business plan. We use a variety of financing sources, including mortgage notes, credit facilities and other term borrowings, as well as preferred equity. Our ability to effectively execute our financing strategy depends on various conditions in the financing markets that are beyond our control, including liquidity and credit spreads.

While we seek non-recourse long-term financing, such financing may not be available to us on favorable terms or at all. If our strategy is not viable, we will have to find alternative forms of financing for our assets, which may include more restrictive recourse borrowings and borrowings with higher debt service that limit our ability to engage in certain transactions and reduce our cash available for distribution to stockholders.

If alternative financing is not available on favorable terms, or at all, we may have to liquidate assets at unfavorable prices to pay off such financing. Substantially all of our borrowings are floating rate and fluctuations in interest rates may cause losses. Substantially all of our existing borrowings bear, and future borrowing may bear, interest at variable rates. If market interest rates increase, the interest rate on our variable rate borrowings will increase and will create higher debt service requirements, which would adversely affect our cash flow and could adversely impact our results of operations.

Interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors, including governmental monetary and tax policies, domestic and international economic and political conditions and other factors beyond our control.

While we may enter into agreements limiting our exposure to higher debt service requirements, any such agreements may not offer complete protection from this risk.

Our interest rate risk sensitive assets, liabilities and related derivatives are generally held for non-trading purposes. Our credit facility permits us to make significant borrowings, which restrict our ability to engage in certain activities and could require that we generate significant cash flow or access the capital markets to satisfy the payment and other obligations.

We may in the future make significant borrowings under our credit facility. We could also obtain additional facilities or increase our line of credit on our existing facility in the future.

Our credit facility contains various affirmative and negative covenants, including, among other things, limitations on debt, liens and restricted payments, as well as financial covenants. Compliance with these covenants restrict our ability to engage in certain transactions, which could materially adversely affect our financial condition. Our ability to meet the payment and other obligations under our credit facility depends on our ability to generate sufficient cash flow or access capital markets in the future.

Our ability to generate cash flow or access capital markets, to some extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative and regulatory factors, as well as other factors that are beyond our control. We cannot assure you that our business will generate cash flow from operations, or that future borrowings will be available to us, in amounts sufficient to enable us to meet our payment obligations under our credit facility.

If we are not able to generate sufficient cash flow to service our credit facility or other borrowing obligations, we may need to refinance or restructure our borrowings, reduce or delay capital investments, or seek to raise additional capital. There is no assurance we will be able to do any of the foregoing on favorable terms or at all. If we are unable to implement one or more of these alternatives, we may not be able to meet our payment obligations under our credit facility, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity.

We may not be able to borrow under our credit facility. Our borrowings may restrict our ability to incur additional indebtedness, such as under our credit facility, based on the value of certain assets that make up a borrowing base. Such investment assets may fluctuate in value. Decreases in value would reduce our borrowing base and could prevent us from borrowing. In addition, our credit facility includes financial maintenance covenants and non-financial covenants.

Breach of any such covenants would block additional borrowings under the facility. Our inability to borrow additional amounts could delay or prevent us from acquiring, financing, and completing desirable investments and could negatively affect our liquidity, which could materially and adversely affect our business.

Inability to borrow could also prevent us from making distributions to our stockholders. In a period of rising interest rates, our interest expense could increase while the income we earn on our investments would not change, which would adversely affect our profitability. Our operating results depend in large part on differences between the income from our investments less our operating costs, reduced by any credit losses and financing costs.

Income from our investments may respond more slowly to interest rate fluctuations than the cost of our borrowings. Consequently, changes in interest rates, particularly short-term interest rates, may influence our net income.

Increases in these rates may decrease our net income. Interest rate fluctuations resulting in our interest expense exceeding the income from our investments could result in losses for us and may limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. In addition, if we need to repay existing borrowings during periods of rising interest rates, we could be required to liquidate one or more of our investments at times that may not permit realization of the maximum return on those investments, which would adversely affect our profitability.

We may not successfully align the maturities of our liabilities with the maturities on our investments, which could harm our operating results and financial condition. This means that we seek to align the maturities of our liabilities with the maturities on our investments in order to manage the risks of being forced to refinance our liabilities prior to the maturities of our investments.

We may fail to appropriately employ match-funded structures on favorable terms, or. We may also determine not to pursue a fully match-funded strategy with respect to a portion of our financings for a variety of reasons.

If we fail to appropriately employ match-funded strategies or determine not to pursue such a strategy, our exposure to interest rate volatility and exposure to matching liabilities prior to the maturity of the corresponding investment may increase substantially, which could harm our operating results, liquidity and financial condition.

We may use short-term borrowings to finance our investments and we may need to use such borrowings for extended periods of time to the extent we are unable to access long-term financing.

This may expose us to increased risks associated with decreases in the fair value of the underlying collateral, which could cause an adverse impact on our results of operations.

We may be dependent on short-term financing arrangements that are not matched in duration to our financial assets. Short-term borrowing through credit facilities and other types of borrowings may put our investments and financial condition at risk. Any such short-term financing may also be recourse to us, which will increase the risk of our investments.

We may obtain additional facilities and increase our lines of credit on existing facilities in the future. Our financing structures may economically resemble short-term, floating-rate financing and usually require the maintenance of specific loan-to-collateral value ratios and other covenants. In addition, the value of assets underlying any such short-term financing may be marked-to-market periodically by the lender, including on a daily basis. If the fair value of the investments subject to such financing arrangements decline, we may be required to provide additional collateral or make cash payments to maintain the loan-to-collateral value ratio.

If we are unable to provide such collateral or cash repayments, we may lose our economic interest in the underlying investments. Further, such borrowings may require us to maintain a certain amount of cash reserves or to set aside unleveraged assets sufficient to maintain a specified liquidity position that would allow us to satisfy our collateral obligations.

These facilities may be restricted to financing certain types of investments, which could impact our investment allocation. There is still time until 31 July - but many taxpayers prefer doing their income tax declaration early in the year. In , there were roughly The average refund was euros. Can this index complement the short-term economic statistics of the Federal Statistical Office Destatis and, especially, can it illustrate a connection between mileage and industrial production? Since mid-December , the truck toll mileage index has been published on the Destatis website as an unadjusted value, in a seasonally adjusted form and as a trend.

At the same time, it has been integrated in the Business Cycle Monitor. Europe in figures features the wide range of data offered by the European statistical office Eurostat and enables comparisons between the EU Member States. We use cookies to provide you with an optimum website design.

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